How to Teach Fourth Grade: The Fantasy Reading Unit

 

“Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep and continuing needs, is good for him.”

Maya Angelou

 

Mary Ehrenworth has a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Teaching from Teachers College. I first learned of Mary from her work with The Teachers College Reading and Writing Project.. I heard Mary speak a few years back on the magical power of literacy in transforming the lives of middle school students. I found her to have a bit of magic herself.  When I realized that she co-wrote Constructing Curriculum:Alternate Units of Study, I knew I had to take a more active role in developing our school’s 4th grade Fantasy Reading Book Club Unit.

Simply put, Mary is one of my heroes of literacy teaching.  If you teach literacy, you should follow her.

From Mary’s writing, our fourth grade teachers are able to teach readers to appreciate that it is ok to find a bit of empathy in villains and recognize the struggles for the protagonist.  She instructs teachers to celebrate the heightened complexity of characters and to acknowledge that we all struggle with good versus evil. This unit is powerful and my students are dripping with excitement to start their book club conversations.

Mary pushed me to realize that not only is it acceptable to teach fantasy to my students, it is wise. To wit; ““Fantasy has been a force for good in literacy” On Harry Potter, Mary writes:” Who wouldn’t love a book that has MILLIONS of children to read.” On the art of teaching: “The best things we can do is to put books into the hands of children….and let those books teach.”

Mary has helped me teach my students that experienced readers take extensive notes to deepen the engagement and to extend the book chat conversations. She helps me to acknowledge and celebrate the different ways students use a pencil to track the actions, thoughts and feelings of the hero. Mary helps me teach “those habits that let you prepare for your book club discussions.”

Mary’s work helps me connect with my students. She instructs me to push research in making up a professional sports team and then compares that work to the research that a writer needs to merge all her characters into a meaningful fantasy.Mary understands the complexity in a classroom setting: “Getting to know a new class of children each year is like getting to know characters in a book.” This quote alone makes me realize that this unit is right for my students

Next week, my students will begin their fantasy book club discussions. Today, as I took notes on their reading work, I realized that many of these kids are profoundly different readers than they were at the beginning of the school year. I am immensely proud of their growth. Alas, I realize that I am merely a conveyor of the wisdom of many fine educators.

Mary Ehrenworth is one such master educator. I am deeply indebted to her work in helping me inspire nine and ten-year olds to read.

 

Mary Ehrenworth

Mary Ehrenworth

 

Constructing Curriculum: Alternative Units of Study

Constructing Curriculum: Alternative Units of StudyRelated articles

Book Clubs in the International School Classroom

The love of learning, the sequestered nooks, And all the sweet serenity of books.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

One of the cooler trends in elementary education is the push to book clubs. My readers’ workshop class has children that love the printed word. In 4th grade, my primary responsibility is to not get in the way and to share my mutual love of books. I do not take this lightly.

I was fortunate to attend a literacy conference at my school where Maggie Moon spoke of her thoughts on book clubs. Maggie is a former NYC schoolteacher and educational consultant from The Reading and Writing Teachers Project, Teachers’ College. She now works as an educational consultant with international schools. She is an invaluable resource. My fellow teachers  and I love her work.

Maggie promotes the liberal use of book clubs in the classroom for they help enhance reading, collaboration, and conversation skills. “When students talk, they provide a clear window to their comprehension,” says Maggie,” as well as strengthen students’ passion for reading good literature.”

Maggie spoke of her goals for elementary-age book clubs. She mentioned that teachers allow students to make title choices. The groups self-manage their groups. The talk should grow new thinking. The groups will increase reading volume and stamina.

Maggie spoke of the role of teachers during a book club conversation. She coached us to lean in and prompt the students to ask specific questions to keep the conversations flowing. She instructed us to model and to highlight the specific traits of a successful book club. She spoke of the teacher as the person responsible for students to become proficient members of book clubs. She spoke of the need to reflect on the conversations so that you can fine-tune your future teaching points.

In my classroom, I have watched my students conduct advanced book talks. They read, read, read, annotate, and then talk. The groups are messy at first but with time they settle into routines that adults would be happy to emulate. My first years at my current school left me agape at what my students could do as readers, thinkers and conversationalists. Now, I take their achievements in stride and push them constantly to think even more deeply. I owe a great deal of thanks to the  many folks such as Maggie Moon for pushing me to strive even higher as a literacy teacher.

They have renewed my passion for teaching.

References:

Moon, M. (2013, March 03). Maggie Moon LinkedIn. Retrieved from http://www.linkedin.com/pub/maggie-moon/3/490/2a8

Related Links to check out:

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/book-clubs-reading-67.html

http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/reading-together/go-clubbing-book-clubs-kids

https://pinterest.com/pin/88805423872839139/

http://www.teachhub.com/student-book-club-guide

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/books.html#CsQCIwuS2jfp1HSk.99

An Interview with a Master Teacher of Balanced Literacy

One of the best perks of my job is that I am able to collaborate with master teachers from around the globe. My school  houses some of the most impressive cast of teachers around and it is an honor each day to learn from them. With that in mind, in the upcoming weeks I am looking to interview a few teachers to both learn and share their craft. imgres

First off is Colin Weaver. Colin is a master teacher and avid hockey player. He was highly recommended from administration. While teaching literacy, Colin notes each discussion with his students. From his extensive note taking, Colin prepares highly effective lessons geared to getting the most from his readers and writers. Students, parents and teachers all rave about Colin’s work.

Elementary literacy teachers…Listen, Learn, Enjoy and Share this professional development opportunity.

It will be nineteen minutes of time well spent.

PodcastIV

How to Teach Literacy to Fourth Grade Students

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Fourth grade is now in session. The students know each other and each kid understands the rules. They are happy and they want to learn. Now, it is time to teach.  It is crucial that the effective fourth grade teacher offer an environment where all students can read and write. This takes investigation, knowledge of pedagogy, and confidence in delivering the curriculum. The master teacher is already developing short-range plans for each student entrusted in her care.

Teaching Reading: Humans are earth’s only cultural species. Our ability to read is perhaps our greatest achievement. The alphabet is an incredible invention that has shaped our lives. “Every teacher bears the burden of experimenting carefully and rigorously to identify the appropriate stimulation strategies that will provide students’ brains with an optimal daily enrichment.”(Dehaene, 2009)

As adults we forget how difficult it is to read. It is imperative to remember and provide connections with each child to their struggles. It is imperative to compliment, compliment and compliment each student’s accomplished goal. This means a teacher must provide daily, time-bound instruction, appropriate text, and time to read.

I am also of the belief that the master teacher should have at least some understanding of how the brain functions while reading.

Teaching Writing: Teach the kids to learn how to write from writers. This has been a game changer in my classroom. Each day, teach the craft of writing. Empathize with your student writers by writing each day yourself. Share your stories, struggles, pitfalls and achievements. The kids will appreciate you and offer you valuable insight.

The act of teaching children to appreciate and acknowledge superior writing is a gift. Give students the time to write each day. Allow them time to share their writing with writing partners. Celebrate with passion and allow for reflection after each unit. Provide ample opportunities for students to learn from mentor texts.

Read Aloud: Each day, after lunch recess, my students grab their water bottles, notebooks, and pencils and sit on the rug, waiting for me to begin my read aloud. My books are reserved for the year but I change titles depending on my mood.  I perhaps model reading with an overbearing sense of awe and drama. I figure that if books do not excite me, then I should not be teaching young ones. “Reading aloud is the single most important classroom structure there is.” (Ray, 1999)

This time is sacred to students and to me. I do not allow the students to lie down and rest during read aloud. I specifically teach them to be wide-awake and to notate during read aloud.

This year, my I have scheduled “accountable talk” time. This time is set aside for the students to talk about their connections, observations, predictions and wonderings about the current read aloud book. The circle discussion is student centered and a pleasure to conduct.

Word Study: Words study in fourth grade is essentially recognizing and developing control of spelling conventions. However, it is so much more in a master teacher’s classroom. When students understand that words are inventions and each word grew from different cultures and circumstances, they begin to appreciate the magic of language. Instruct students to analyze and sort words each week and reflect on their growth. Allow time for students to investigate idioms. This is always time well spent.

This is enough for today. Enjoy your students and have an amazing year of literacy.

Dehaene, S. (2012). Reading in the brain, the new science of how we read. Penguin Paperbacks.

Ray, K. W. (1999). Wondrous words, writers and writing in the elementary classroom. Natl Council of Teachers.